adding organic materials

detail from Kilmar #2  (2019) In recent paintings I’ve added organic materials to gesso and/or acrylics, creating texture and lines – soil, salt, wood ash, crushed eggshell, dried grass, sheep’s wool and so on – whatever I pick up from the environment that I’m working from. So, remembering Anselm Kiefer (B. 1945), large scale works that incorporated various materials including ash and wire – https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/kiefer-lilith-t05742 – Sandra Blow (1925-2006) painting Space and Matter in which she she used a liquid cement on the board and, while this was wet, applied chaff and other substances and then used charcoal and thin glazes of oil paint to produce the desired effect. This one is… Read More

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Nature Paintings

detail from painting by Alyssa di Edwardo Keith Tyson (b.1969) was the 2002 Turner Prize winner for his series of works entitled Nature Paintings. “Despite the increasing uproar around that year’s selection, Tyson was praised by the judging panel for his work’s ‘strong visual energy’ across a diverse range of media that included drawing, painting, sculpture and installation.” (ArtUK.org)  I’ve found one more in this series on his instagram page https://www.instagram.com/keithtyson23/ Alyssa di Edwardo (b. 1957) is an Abstract Expressionist painter whose work I find more interesting and prefer. Reminding me of Joan Mitchell, see my post:  https://jillgoodman.co.uk/joan-mitchell From Edwardo’s website: “Gestural brushstrokes pull the viewer towards a psychological landscape perhaps making the work… Read More

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Van Gogh trees

Van Gogh painted these weather-beaten pine trees six months before his death, during his stay in the Saint-Rémy hospital. He made 20 paintings and sketches of the pine trees in and around the asylum. Trees held a special resonance for Van Gogh and in numerous letters he expressed his belief in their spiritual and anthropomorphic qualities. Occasionally he saw his own state of being reflected in their fate and he found their strength and capacity to endure nature’s fury inspiring. (Van Gogh at the National Gallery of Victoria) This and more images at the Kroller-Muller Museum, Netherlands. Related Images:

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Costing the earth

Climate change How do we make the invisible visible? Can artists, alongside scientists, make artwork to do this? Listening today to this Radio 4 programme ‘Costing the Earth’ https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00017b8 Artists have always responded to the environment, but “this is a real problem now…. because the environment is under threat”. How can we make art now about the relationship of human beings to the environment – “…… we have become a disease on the surface of the planet. This changes everything.” (Julian Spalding, former director of the Natural History Museum).   Related Images:

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60%

Humanity has managed to wipe out 60% of Earth’s animal populations since 1970 The Living Planet Index, produced for WWF by the Zoological Society of London, uses data on 16,704 populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians, representing more than 4,000 species, to track the decline of wildlife between 1970 and 2014. www.wwf.org.uk/updates/living-planet-report-2018 We are continuing to destroy habitats, pollute air and water, and add to the causes of climate change.  Our consumption of food and resources is destroying the web of life that has been billions of years in the making.  The biggest cause of wildlife losses is the destruction of natural habitats, much of it to create farmland.… Read More

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