pears

So many pears on the pear tree this year. This first ‘Pears’ painting is looking down onto the fruits on the table by my easel, looking simply at the colours and shapes with dark outline, as an abstract representation: Then from the side, three pears. The grouping and the quality of the surface of the pears which had dropped to the ground in the wind. Here they are shown where I placed them on a window ledge to ripen. On completion of this small painting, I recalled the beautiful drawings of pears by Martha Alf, done using a 4B pencil on paper, tiny marks placed to create the variations in… Read More

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schoolstrike4climate

Students are striking today, across the UK, Europe and the world. students’ placards: ‘It’s our time to rise up’ ‘Make Earth Cool Again’ ‘There’s No Planet B’ Their demands: Declare a Climate Emergency Education about Climate change Tell us the facts Lower the voting age see the manifesto on https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/mar/15/uk-student-climate-network-manifesto-declare-emergency #schoolstrike4climate #Fridaysforfuture https://www.fridaysforfuture.org Related Images:

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adding organic materials

detail from Kilmar #2  (2019) In recent paintings I’ve added organic materials to gesso and/or acrylics, creating texture and lines – soil, salt, wood ash, crushed eggshell, dried grass, sheep’s wool and so on – whatever I pick up from the environment that I’m working from. So, remembering Anselm Kiefer (B. 1945), large scale works that incorporated various materials including ash and wire – https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/kiefer-lilith-t05742 – Sandra Blow (1925-2006) painting Space and Matter in which she she used a liquid cement on the board and, while this was wet, applied chaff and other substances and then used charcoal and thin glazes of oil paint to produce the desired effect. This one is… Read More

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Nature Paintings

detail from painting by Alyssa di Edwardo Keith Tyson (b.1969) was the 2002 Turner Prize winner for his series of works entitled Nature Paintings. “Despite the increasing uproar around that year’s selection, Tyson was praised by the judging panel for his work’s ‘strong visual energy’ across a diverse range of media that included drawing, painting, sculpture and installation.” (ArtUK.org)  I’ve found one more in this series on his instagram page https://www.instagram.com/keithtyson23/ Alyssa di Edwardo (b. 1957) is an Abstract Expressionist painter whose work I find more interesting and prefer. Reminding me of Joan Mitchell, see my post:  https://jillgoodman.co.uk/joan-mitchell From Edwardo’s website: “Gestural brushstrokes pull the viewer towards a psychological landscape perhaps making the work… Read More

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Alf Lohr

Alfred Lohr creates stunning abstract works using acrylic, oil, inks and mixed media on paper and canvas, or in watercolours.  Löhr’s large abstract works capture time and fluidity. His paintings are a complex interaction between color, form and pictorial space. He works with many layers of paint on paper or canvas, mostly translucent, which in the process of painting are sometimes removed again and replaced by new ones.  (https://www.fineartslondon.co.uk/alf-lohr) Related Images:

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Costing the earth

Climate change How do we make the invisible visible? Can artists, alongside scientists, make artwork to do this? Listening today to this Radio 4 programme ‘Costing the Earth’ https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00017b8 Artists have always responded to the environment, but “this is a real problem now…. because the environment is under threat”. How can we make art now about the relationship of human beings to the environment – “…… we have become a disease on the surface of the planet. This changes everything.” (Julian Spalding, former director of the Natural History Museum).   Related Images:

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abstract artists

Why abstract? Some quotes and comments on abstraction, I find these useful to return to: ‘The picture is not the vehicle of meaning: it is the meaning.’ Patrick Heron.  Heron’s work stems from his belief of painting not being dependant on external references for its meaning:  the impact on the viewer is not dependant on describing the world beyond. For Heron, the meaning was in the painted surface, the all-over interconnected and unified visual field – balance of composition through colour, light and shape. The distinction between figure and ground does not exist as each colour-shape or area however large or small, is as important within the painting as any… Read More

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acrylic paints

I’ve been experimenting with acrylic paint as an alternative to oil paints. Firstly because I wanted to work more quickly, and acrylics dry in a few hours, or overnight. But also I’m attracted to the wide range of colours, and how easy these are to use thinly, as a fluid, or thicker with medium, and to add textures. For reference I’ve looked at artists who work in acrylic paint, or changed from oils to acrylics. Here are a few I’ve admired:  Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011) changed from oils to acrylics. Best known for her works in thinned oil paints poured onto unprimed canvas so that the colour would seep into the canvas, working… Read More

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Patrick Heron at Tate St Ives

Seeing this wonderful collection of paintings by Patrick Heron, with works at this large scale and alongside each other and from different periods, with one painting relating to another: intense colour, the pleasure of following a line across the canvas, the detail of a pattern, abstraction, looking from one shape/pattern to another around the canvas – this was an intense, exciting and joyful experience.     Here are the main ideas he persued:   Unity Heron strived for a balance across the canvas, the forms and colours interconnected by their position and their visual affect together, so that each area of colour/shape ” is as important within the painting as any… Read More

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