We Cannot Say… painting

‘We Cannot Say We Were Not Warned’ Click images to see a larger size, and click the arrows to go on or back This painting is on canvas, 30x120cm The title is from an article by Astra Taylor, in which she talks about her book Democracy may not exist but we’ll miss it when it’s gone: www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/01/bad-ancestors-climate-crisis-democracy And aout her documentary film, What Is Democracy? https://jacobinmag.com/2019/08/what-is-democracy-film-astra-taylor Related Images:

Continue Reading

Greta Thunberg

The First Dog on the Moon and ‘The Greta Thunberg Problem’, published today in The Guardian – an amazing young person and my favourite cartoon: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/27/the-greta-thunberg-problem-so-many-men-freaking-out-about-the-tiny-swedish-climate-demon And her speech at the European Parliament on Tuesday (16 April), Greta urges MEPs to “start panicking about climate change” rather than “waste time arguing about Brexit”. Related Images:

Continue Reading

World Environment Day

5th June “It is time to act decisively. My message to governments is clear: tax pollution; end fossil fuel subsidies; and stop building new coal plants. We need a green economy not a grey economy.” — Secretary-General, António Guterres https://www.un.org/en/events/environmentday/ https://www.worldenvironmentday.global Today I’ve collected and replanted 3 little oak trees. These were seedlings from last autumn’s acorns, growing in my vegetable plots. They’ll be planted out in the woodland in October. Trees help to combat global heating by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Our woodland was planted in December 2000, it’s now well-established and home to many wildlife. Related Images:

Continue Reading

rapid decline of natural ecosystems

“We should have gone to the doctor sooner. We are in a bad way” Prof Andy Pervis, Natural History Museum, London, and author of the UN Global Assessment Report, in The Guardian 07/05/2019 “Make no mistake, this report will change your life,” says .  Prof David Reay at the University of Edinburgh, in The Guardian online 02/05/2019 “The health of ecosystems on which we and other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever. We are eroding the very foundations of enemies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide….. we have lost time. We must act now” Robert Watson, chair of the Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity… Read More

Continue Reading

Costing the earth

Climate change How do we make the invisible visible? Can artists, alongside scientists, make artwork to do this? Listening today to this Radio 4 programme ‘Costing the Earth’ https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00017b8 Artists have always responded to the environment, but “this is a real problem now…. because the environment is under threat”. How can we make art now about the relationship of human beings to the environment – “…… we have become a disease on the surface of the planet. This changes everything.” (Julian Spalding, former director of the Natural History Museum).   Related Images:

Continue Reading

60%

Humanity has managed to wipe out 60% of Earth’s animal populations since 1970 The Living Planet Index, produced for WWF by the Zoological Society of London, uses data on 16,704 populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians, representing more than 4,000 species, to track the decline of wildlife between 1970 and 2014. www.wwf.org.uk/updates/living-planet-report-2018 We are continuing to destroy habitats, pollute air and water, and add to the causes of climate change.  Our consumption of food and resources is destroying the web of life that has been billions of years in the making.  The biggest cause of wildlife losses is the destruction of natural habitats, much of it to create farmland.… Read More

Continue Reading

12-year window

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate (IPCC – http://ipcc.ch/organization/organization.shtml ) change have published a key report which calls for urgent action to limit global temperature rise to 1.5C in order to prevent environmental catastrophe. The IPCC assessments draws on the work of hundreds of scientists from all over the world who volunteer their time and expertise. The report illustrates mounting impacts and fast-approaching, irreversible tipping points. Nicolas Stern: Accelerate the transition to clean and sustainable growth or suffer the mounting damage from sea-level rise, floods and droughts that will severely hinder efforts to tackle poverty, raise living standards and improve prosperity…… Governments, companies and communities should embrace this transition to a clean and sustainable… Read More

Continue Reading

Yawning at the apocalypse

A pig ate his fill of acorns under an oak tree and then started to root around the tree. A crow remarked,’ You should not do this. If you lay bare the roots, the tree will wither and die.’ ‘Let it die,’ said the pig. ‘Who cares so long as there are acorns?’   [adapted from a fable by Andrew Krylov in the article quoted below]   Yawning at the apocalypse is the title of an article I’ve just read in ‘the psychologist’ magazine , written by Cameron Brick and Sander van der Linden, on how psychologists can help solve the largest social dilemma in history – climate change. Here’s a couple of… Read More

Continue Reading

it’s warming up

Almost ready for open studio, and the days are warming up which will make it much nicer for people visiting. There shouldn’t be any frost this week (according to the Met Office) so I’ve planted out some of my carefully nurtured beans and the mini sweetcorn into the warm soil in my vegetable garden. This painting, possibly finished today, I’ve called Warming. This morning I read about a report by researchers based at Exeter Uni, about their studies of plant life in Antarctica – which exists on just 0.3% of the continent – and particularly the moss banks. the warming climate of Antarctica in the past 50 years has spurred on… Read More

Continue Reading

blue upon blue

One of the world’s most remote places, an uninhabited coral atoll, is also one of its most polluted. Henderson Island, a tiny landmass in the eastern South Pacific, has been found by marine scientists to have the highest density of anthropogenic debris recorded anywhere in the world, with 99.8% of the pollution plastic. The nearly 18 tonnes of plastic piling up on an island that is otherwise mostly untouched by humans have been pointed to as evidence of the catastrophic, “grotesque” extent of marine plastic pollution. We’ve been arguing about climate change, and whether it exists and what is changing, for the better part of 40 years … “Let’s not… Read More

Continue Reading