Costing the earth

Climate change How do we make the invisible visible? Can artists, alongside scientists, make artwork to do this? Listening today to this Radio 4 programme ‘Costing the Earth’ https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00017b8 Artists have always responded to the environment, but “this is a real problem now…. because the environment is under threat”. How can we make art now about the relationship of human beings to the environment – “…… we have become a disease on the surface of the planet. This changes everything.” (Julian Spalding, former director of the Natural History Museum).   Related Images:

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Yawning at the apocalypse

A pig ate his fill of acorns under an oak tree and then started to root around the tree. A crow remarked,’ You should not do this. If you lay bare the roots, the tree will wither and die.’ ‘Let it die,’ said the pig. ‘Who cares so long as there are acorns?’   [adapted from a fable by Andrew Krylov in the article quoted below]   Yawning at the apocalypse is the title of an article I’ve just read in ‘the psychologist’ magazine , written by Cameron Brick and Sander van der Linden, on how psychologists can help solve the largest social dilemma in history – climate change. Here’s a couple of… Read More

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wildlife in my garden

Three young hedgehogs are snuffling round my vegetable garden and one knowingly finds a way into the fruit-cage. I leave bowls of water around the garden, the days are very hot and dry.  Hedgehog populations are declining drastically. see https://www.britishhedgehogs.org.uk/state-britains-hedgehogs-2018/   And there are very few butterflies around. One or two Tortoiseshell, a few green-veined white, a Red Admiral, a Peacock. Occasionally I see a Comma, and a Painted Lady. Inn the woodland there are Speckled Wood, a few Ringlets and the small browns – the gatekeeper and meadow brown. There are more whites now, my kale plants are well netted! For many years I counted wildlife in my garden and… Read More

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Bearah Tor trees

A walk to Bearah Tor on Bodmin Moor, not far from my studio. Very hot, each low hawthorn tree was providing shelter to a sheep with her lamb.  Stopped to make a few quick sketches on my phone pad (new to me – I like it, though it’s very small and maybe use a pointed tool rather than my finger)     Then in water colours.                                Back in the studio I made a series of small oil paintings:                     see the tree series      … Read More

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Heath Spotted Orchids

Fritillary butterflies and wild orchids on Bodmin Moor. This was a perfect afternoon for the butterflies so I walked to a delightful corner of Bodmin Moor, a little marshy area on the side of Hawk’s Tor, by a stream that flows to the River Lynher. These are Heath Spotted Orchids and a Small Pear-boardered Fritillary. In the final photo you may spot the Golden-ringed Dragonfly. ” template=”default” order_by=”sortorder” order_direction=”DESC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″]  Link: All the Moor Butterflies Related Images:

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it’s warming up

Almost ready for open studio, and the days are warming up which will make it much nicer for people visiting. There shouldn’t be any frost this week (according to the Met Office) so I’ve planted out some of my carefully nurtured beans and the mini sweetcorn into the warm soil in my vegetable garden. This painting, possibly finished today, I’ve called Warming. This morning I read about a report by researchers based at Exeter Uni, about their studies of plant life in Antarctica – which exists on just 0.3% of the continent – and particularly the moss banks. the warming climate of Antarctica in the past 50 years has spurred on… Read More

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blue upon blue

One of the world’s most remote places, an uninhabited coral atoll, is also one of its most polluted. Henderson Island, a tiny landmass in the eastern South Pacific, has been found by marine scientists to have the highest density of anthropogenic debris recorded anywhere in the world, with 99.8% of the pollution plastic. The nearly 18 tonnes of plastic piling up on an island that is otherwise mostly untouched by humans have been pointed to as evidence of the catastrophic, “grotesque” extent of marine plastic pollution. We’ve been arguing about climate change, and whether it exists and what is changing, for the better part of 40 years … “Let’s not… Read More

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anthropocene

‘The Shock of the Anthropocene’ by Bonneuil and Fressoz. I decided it was time to read this – I’m taking it very slowly!  …. climate change, increases in extinction of species and loss of habitats, problems relating to air pollution, and other major changes to our planet including new substances being deposited in the planet’s ecosystems – all reflecting a change in the Earth system, these and other major transformations ‘that attest our entry into the Anthropocene’ Since teaching ‘Earthkeepers’ (Earth Education programme www.eartheducation.org.uk), then being a member of Green Tourism (Green Tourism) where possible I make decisions – just small gestures really – towards a more sustainable way to live.  We live on one planet with… Read More

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