Heath Spotted Orchids

Fritillary butterflies and wild orchids on Bodmin Moor. This was a perfect afternoon for the butterflies so I walked to a delightful corner of Bodmin Moor, a little marshy area on the side of Hawk’s Tor, by a stream that flows to the River Lynher. These are Heath Spotted Orchids and a Small Pear-boardered Fritillary. In the final photo you may spot the Golden-ringed Dragonfly. ” template=”default” order_by=”sortorder” order_direction=”DESC” returns=”included” maximum_entity_count=”500″]  Link: All the Moor Butterflies Related Images:

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Nine Stones

Nine Stones stone circle on Bodmin Moor A bright September morning. We walked from Tolcarne in North Hill Parish following footpath 2 to just beyond Clitters cottage, then bearing left up the hill to the open area between Ridge and Fox Tor to the Nine Stones. Colours changing hues under a darkening sky; bracken, granite, sheep and moorland ponies, and a view across the open moor to Brown Willy on the horizon. See my Nine Stones images from today’s walk. See the map on: map.cornwall.gov.uk This afternoon I continued with the paintings that I started after the walk to Hawk’s Tor – granite and heather. Using cold wax medium with oils,… Read More

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land, sea, sky

Two canvases are waiting to be finished since I made my first post, ‘of land, sea and sky’. They are both 70x100cm, bigger than I’m used to but I like this size. I like the freedom to explore a space, and learning to cope with larger areas. I find myself thinking about the paintings by Peter Lanyon, his paintings derived from landscape of west Cornwall – ‘Lanyon strove to find a language of painting that expressed his direct experience of the landscape which might also probe questions about the nature of our existence within the world.’ And his need to experience the landscape from different perspectives, whether hanging over the edge of a cliff,… Read More

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scraping and scratching

Working on Hawk’s Tor paintings This afternoon I scraped off much of the paint that I put on this morning, revealing some of the darker colours, then added more purple using cold wax medium. I’ve only recently found out about this medium and started using it; really helpful. Finding out about cold wax took me to Rebecca Crowell’s website www.rebeccacrowell.com. Her work is very interesting, and the processes she uses to produce the beautiful panels. So I’ll carry on layering, scraping, more colour, editing and hopefully getting somewhere. My Hawk’s Tor paintings are working towards abstraction, which is what I’d wanted, searching how to get there. I’m starting to see the work in a… Read More

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after the harvest

A wonderful sunny morning so we walked from here, through Tremollett and onto footpath 16. This is a lovely route through fields with Sharp tor and Bearah Tor on the horizon (see my images taken this morning along FP 16). After the harvest the stubble fields are changing colour, towards ochre, and a small field of barley not yet cut has become very dry and pale. So I completed the painting below this afternoon. Then worked on the two above, which are of Hawk’s Tor, the heather, bracken and granite. Related Images:

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starting on Hawk’s Tor paintings

I’m painting over three small old canvases, starting with dark shadows and the colours of the heather. I’ll let that dry then see where it take me. Moving now in a more abstract direction I find myself looking again at Notes to myself: Diebenkorn’s 10 rules for painting on the RA blog, and comments from artists about their own ‘rules’. Also I’m looking at the paintings by Adam Milford (based I think in Plymouth or Cornwall) his name was mentioned to me this weekend. His abstract works, which I like, begin with landscape; so I found these interesting to look at. Related Images:

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Hawk’s Tor

Hawk’s Tor on Bodmin Moor The top of Hawk’s Tor is covered in heather, more than we usually see. Perhaps there’s fewer sheep grazing now – there were none here today, and the tracks are quite overgrown. The stream in the little valley below is Withey Brook, flowing down to the River Lynher. There’s a lovely footpath – actually a bridleway but very rough going for bikes – down the the valley through Castick Wood, above the cascading stream . Hawk’s Tor is on Access Land – see OS Explorer Map 109. See my Hawk’s Tor images and Bodmin Moor paintingshttps://jillgoodman.co.uk/paintings-2016/bodmin-moor     Related Images:

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Kreft Landreyne

Open weekend here at Landreyne for friends and family. Image above: Landreyne Studio – this is my studio entrance, with Domspottery display in the garage (Dom didn’t want to be in the picture!) It was great to walk around and visit you all today. Thank you! (And well done for raising £159 for Children’s Hospice South West) And my neighbours:                     Related Images:

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frames & fields

frames Today I’ve collected some of my monotypes from local framer, Dom. He’s done this really well, using these narrow black frames. fields From my studio I look across the valley to fields of grass and barley. The grass fields are grazed by sheep with their lambs, and cattle. Some are cut for hay to store for the winter; crops are grown for animal feed – barley, maize and oats, with the straw used in the sheds for bedding. So all these fields around here are used for producing meat. I don’t often eat meat. I remember my sister when she was a young teenager (in the ’60s) announcing that she would now be a… Read More

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butterflies – and a bit more

8 Red Admiral butterflies on the buddleia this morning. Around the garden, woodland and meadow I’m seeing small tortoiseshell, peacock, gatekeeper, meadow brown, speckled wood and large white. Throughout the summer we also see comma, wall brown, ringlet, small copper and common blue. Red Admiral This is one of the largest butterflies that we see in this country. They arrive in spring from southern Europe, and from May onwards there will be more around as they breed. When the temperatures start to fall the new adults fly south. Usually any remaining in Britain for the winter do not survive the cold.   Have you heard of Butterfly Homes? Wonderful Coombe House where my mother now lives,… Read More

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